News/Press Releases

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 17, 2013

Hancock Bank, Gulf Coast Community Foundation tap nine
outstanding Mississippi teachers for 2013 Leo W. Seal grants


Penny Dearman
Penny Dearman

East Central Middle School

Stephanie Beauchamp
Stephanie Beauchamp
North Woolmarket Elementary & Middle School

Jean Adkison
Jean Adkison
East Central Upper
Elementary School

Marsha GainesMarsha Gaines
Jeff Davis Elementary School

Julie Hadley
Julie Hadley
West Harrison High School

Jeanelle HardwickJeanelle Hardwick
Biloxi High School

Gerald HuffmanGerald Huffman
Gulfport High School

Kristi Lindsey
Kristi Lindsey

Hancock Middle School

Daniel ZwergDaniel Zwerg
St. Stanislaus College

 

 

GULFPORT, Miss. (April 17, 2013) — Nine Mississippi teachers earned high marks today for creative educational excellence as winners of the Leo W. Seal Innovative Teacher Grants. Honored during an awards luncheon in Gulfport, 2013 Seal award recipients are Jean Adkison of East Central Upper Elementary School in Vancleave, Stephanie Beauchamp of North Woolmarket Elementary & Middle School in Biloxi, Penny Dearman of East Central Middle School in Hurley, Marsha Gaines of Jeff Davis Elementary School in Biloxi, Julie Hadley of West Harrison High School in Gulfport, Jeanelle Hardwick of Biloxi High School in Biloxi, Gerald Huffman of Gulfport High School in Gulfport, Kristi Lindsey of Hancock Middle School in Kiln, and Daniel Zwerg of St. Stanislaus College in Bay St. Louis.

Selected based on proposals for innovative classroom projects complementing curriculums, winners received grants up to $2,000 and crystal apple awards. School superintendents from across the state were invited to the ceremony, which featured a slideshow highlighting the winning teachers' initiatives and speaker Keith Williams, Hancock Holding Company's Chief Credit Officer and Senior Vice President.

"We continue to honor the legacy of the Seal family in recognizing and rewarding the exceptional educators we have throughout Mississippi," said Williams. "Hancock Bank is committed to education and supports teachers who work tirelessly to develop innovative teaching solutions, demonstrate strong leadership and have passion about the role they play in developing tomorrow's leaders."

Established in 1994 and funded by Hancock Bank, the Leo W. Seal grants recognize and encourage educational excellence by underwriting original classroom teaching initiatives developed by teachers in Forrest, Hancock, Harrison, Jackson, Jefferson Davis, Lamar, and Pearl River counties. The awards also commemorate the leadership of Leo W. Seal Sr.—Hancock Bank president from 1932 until his death in 1963, and his son, the late Leo W. Seal Jr., Hancock's chief executive for 45 years, in facilitating countless economic and educational opportunities for the region. The Gulf Coast Community Foundation (GCCF) manages the endowment as a permanent fund of the GCCF's Pat Santucci Friends of Public Education program and coordinates the selection of winners.

Nomination forms for the 2014 Leo W. Seal Innovative Teacher Grants will be available at all Hancock Bank branches and school offices in the seven Mississippi counties in fall 2013. The deadline to return nominations to the GCCF is November 15.

About the Winning Projects

Jean Adkison's project, "LEGOs & My Simple Machine," will help East Central Upper Elementary School students develop engineering skills by constructing gears, pulleys, levers, wheels and axles. Students will calculate ratio gears, build working models of fixed and movable pulleys, learn lever concepts and make discoveries regarding friction to increase understanding of these concepts.

Through "Our Class Garden," Stephanie Beauchamp's North Woolmarket Elementary & Middle School first-graders will plant and care for a variety of fruits, vegetables and herbs during the year to learn the importance of preserving property for the use of crops, the benefits of fresh vegetables, the responsibilities of growing and various means of preparing their own food.

Boosting Engineering Science and Technology or BEST, proposed by Penny Dearman, will use real world applications of middle school skills to inspire her East Central Middle School students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and math. Through participation in a sports-like, STEM-based robotics competition, the students will be involved in building a robot, programming software and creating a market presentation.

Marsha Gaines' "Singing My Fears Away!" is a performance-based class she will implement at Jeff Davis Elementary School. Students will be inspired to push beyond their fears and gain confidence in public speaking and singing using a quality sound system with recording capability, microphones and CDs. Ongoing lessons will focus on proper microphone technique, performance skills and opportunity for feedback.

"Exploring Marine Science with the SeaPerch Remotely Operated Marine Vehicle" is a project that will incorporate the physical construction of an underwater vehicle with scientific concepts taught in the classroom, such as buoyancy, density, electrical engineering and circuitry. After constructing these vehicles, Julie Hadley's West Harrison High School students will compete in a regional competition based on maneuvering skills, speed and design.

Jeanelle Hardwick's Biloxi Achieving Success in Science or BASS is a project where funds will be used to create kits to allow teachers the opportunity to engage students in lab demonstrations or experiments that increase student comprehension that would otherwise be inaccessible or cost-prohibitive. These kits will be shared and accessible to both elementary and middle school teachers.

"Using Construction to Build Future Leaders" will give Gerald Huffman's Gulfport High School students hands-on experience by constructing a greenhouse. Other academic areas will also benefit: Culinary students can harvest and use the produce to cook, earth science students can study and explore different ways to grow the produce, and the STEM Institute can explore sustainable energy alternatives, water harvesting for irrigation and various other technologies.

Kristi Lindsey's "Throw Yourself in ART!" will use clay to educate and engage students, who will create ceramic vessels, discuss ancient and modern ceramic works and artists, experience various techniques of throwing clay on a modern pottery wheel and discover both the physical and chemical changes that occur as part of the ceramic process. This project is designed to integrate math, science, language arts and history into one experience.

"Aeronautics" will allow Daniel Zwerg's students to be introduced to the physics of aviation by building planes and programming transmitters to fly the planes. Students will learn in a practical way how airplanes fly, pilot inputs necessary to maintain flight, adjustments necessary to accommodate winds and other variables, and how to build and maintain mechanical and electrical systems.

About Hancock Bank

With assets of almost $20 billion, Hancock Holding Company (Nasdaq: HBHC) is the parent company of Hancock Bank in Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida and Whitney Bank in Louisiana and Texas. The company operates 258 branches and more than 350 ATMs across a Gulf South corridor spanning metropolitan Houston, Texas, southern Louisiana, South Mississippi, southern Alabama, and the Panhandle, northern, and central regions of Florida. More information and e-Banking are available at www.hancockbank.com.

—30—

For More Information
Lea Ivey Stone
Corporate Community Relations Manager
228.563.7954
lea.stone@hancockbank.com